Dollar: Wikipedia summary by WikiSummarizer

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Wikipedia article:  Dollar

 

Dollar

 

Dollar (100)

 

·         The dollar (often represented by the dollar sign $) is the name of the official currency of many countries, including Australia, Belize, Brunei, Canada, East Timor, the Eastern Caribbean territories, Ecuador, El Salvador, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Panama, Singapore, Suriname, Taiwan, and the United States.

 

·         The word dollar had been in use in the English language as a variant for thaler for about 200 years before the founding of the United States, with many quotes in the plays of Shakespeare referring to dollars as money.

 

Wikipedia article:  Dollar

 

Dollar

 

Dollar (100)

 

·         The dollar (often represented by the dollar sign $) is the name of the official currency of many countries, including Australia, Belize, Brunei, Canada, East Timor, the Eastern Caribbean territories, Ecuador, El Salvador, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Panama, Singapore, Suriname, Taiwan, and the United States.

 

·         One such example, the Dutch lion dollar, circulated throughout the Middle East and was imitated in several German and Italian cities.

 

·         By the mid-18th century, the lion dollar had been replaced by the Spanish "pieces of eight" which were distributed widely in the Spanish colonies in the New World and in the Philippines.

 

·         On April 2, 1792, U. S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton reported to Congress the precise amount of silver found in Spanish milled dollar coins in common use in the States.

 

·         As a result, the United States Dollar was defined as a unit of weight equaling 371 4/16th grains (24.057 grams) of pure silver, or 416 grains of standard silver (standard silver being defined as 1,485 parts fine silver to 179 parts alloy).

 

·         In an act passed in January 1837, the dollar's alloy (amount of non-silver metal present) was set at 11%.

 

·         Silver was mostly removed from U. S. coinage by 1965 and the dollar became a free-floating fiat currency without a commodity backing defined in terms of real gold or silver.

 

·         The word dollar had been in use in the English language as a variant for thaler for about 200 years before the founding of the United States, with many quotes in the plays of Shakespeare referring to dollars as money.

 

·         Canada and Newfoundland were already on the gold standard, and the result was that the value of the dollar in North America increased in relation to silver dollars being used elsewhere, particularly Latin America and the Far East.

 

·         Hence, by 1935, when China and Hong Kong came off the silver standard, the Straits dollar was worth 2s 4d (11.5p approx) sterling, whereas the Hong Kong dollar was worth only 1s 3d sterling (6p approx).

 

·         The term "dollar" has also been adopted by other countries for currencies which do not share a common history with other dollars.

 

·         Examples include the Australian dollar, the New Zealand dollar, the Jamaican dollar, the Cayman Islands dollar, the Fiji dollar, the Namibian dollar, the Rhodesian dollar, the Zimbabwe dollar, and the Solomon Islands dollar.

 

·         Malaysia: the Malaysian Ringgit used to be called the "Malaysian Dollar".

 

·         Rhodesia: the Rhodesian dollar replaced the Rhodesian pound in 1970 and it was used until Zimbabwe came into being in 1980.

 

·          Anguilla  Bermuda  Bonaire (Netherlands)  British Indian Ocean Territory  Sint Eustatius (Netherlands)  British Virgin Islands  Cayman Islands  Montserrat  Saba (Netherlands)  Turks and Caicos Islands  Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France) (alongside the Euro) Afghanistan Cambodia Lebanon Mexico Peru Guatemala Panama Bolivia Fiat Money Eurodollar Amero Dollar sign List of circulating currencies Petrodollar United States one hundred-dollar bill Etymonline (word history) for "buck" and Etymonline (word history) for "dollar" Thesaurus (synonyms) Currency converter CNNMoney.com

 

silver (100)

 

·         On the 15th of January, 1520, Count Hieronymus Schlick (Czech: Jeronэm Šlik z Passounu) of Bohemia began minting coins known as Joachimsthaler, named for Joachimstal (modern Jбchymov in the Czech Republic), where the silver was mined.

 

·         On April 2, 1792, U. S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton reported to Congress the precise amount of silver found in Spanish milled dollar coins in common use in the States.

 

·         As a result, the United States Dollar was defined as a unit of weight equaling 371 4/16th grains (24.057 grams) of pure silver, or 416 grains of standard silver (standard silver being defined as 1,485 parts fine silver to 179 parts alloy).

 

·         In an act passed in January 1837, the dollar's alloy (amount of non-silver metal present) was set at 11%.

 

·         Silver was mostly removed from U. S. coinage by 1965 and the dollar became a free-floating fiat currency without a commodity backing defined in terms of real gold or silver.

 

·         Canada and Newfoundland were already on the gold standard, and the result was that the value of the dollar in North America increased in relation to silver dollars being used elsewhere, particularly Latin America and the Far East.

 

·         Hence, by 1935, when China and Hong Kong came off the silver standard, the Straits dollar was worth 2s 4d (11.5p approx) sterling, whereas the Hong Kong dollar was worth only 1s 3d sterling (6p approx).

 

coins (79)

 

·         On the 15th of January, 1520, Count Hieronymus Schlick (Czech: Jeronэm Šlik z Passounu) of Bohemia began minting coins known as Joachimsthaler, named for Joachimstal (modern Jбchymov in the Czech Republic), where the silver was mined.

 

·         The coins minted at Joachimsthal soon lent their name to other coins of similar size and weight from other places.

 

·         Pieces of eight (so-called because they were worth eight "reals") became known as Spanish dollars in the English-speaking world because of their similarity in size and weight to the earlier Thaler coins.

 

·         On April 2, 1792, U. S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton reported to Congress the precise amount of silver found in Spanish milled dollar coins in common use in the States.

 

Spanish (50)

 

·         By the mid-18th century, the lion dollar had been replaced by the Spanish "pieces of eight" which were distributed widely in the Spanish colonies in the New World and in the Philippines.

 

·         Pieces of eight (so-called because they were worth eight "reals") became known as Spanish dollars in the English-speaking world because of their similarity in size and weight to the earlier Thaler coins.

 

·         This symbol (two pillars with S-shaped motto) first appeared in Spaniard 'Pieces of eight', the currency used in the American colonies of the Spanish Empire, which spread to the British colonies and would continue to be used in the United States and Canada.

 

·         Common in the Thirteen Colonies, Spanish dollars were even legal tender in one colony, Virginia.

 

·         On April 2, 1792, U. S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton reported to Congress the precise amount of silver found in Spanish milled dollar coins in common use in the States.

 

United States (50)

 

·         The dollar (often represented by the dollar sign $) is the name of the official currency of many countries, including Australia, Belize, Brunei, Canada, East Timor, the Eastern Caribbean territories, Ecuador, El Salvador, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Panama, Singapore, Suriname, Taiwan, and the United States.

 

·         This symbol (two pillars with S-shaped motto) first appeared in Spaniard 'Pieces of eight', the currency used in the American colonies of the Spanish Empire, which spread to the British colonies and would continue to be used in the United States and Canada.

 

·         As a result, the United States Dollar was defined as a unit of weight equaling 371 4/16th grains (24.057 grams) of pure silver, or 416 grains of standard silver (standard silver being defined as 1,485 parts fine silver to 179 parts alloy).

 

·         The word dollar had been in use in the English language as a variant for thaler for about 200 years before the founding of the United States, with many quotes in the plays of Shakespeare referring to dollars as money.

 

·          Anguilla  Bermuda  Bonaire (Netherlands)  British Indian Ocean Territory  Sint Eustatius (Netherlands)  British Virgin Islands  Cayman Islands  Montserrat  Saba (Netherlands)  Turks and Caicos Islands  Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France) (alongside the Euro) Afghanistan Cambodia Lebanon Mexico Peru Guatemala Panama Bolivia Fiat Money Eurodollar Amero Dollar sign List of circulating currencies Petrodollar United States one hundred-dollar bill Etymonline (word history) for "buck" and Etymonline (word history) for "dollar" Thesaurus (synonyms) Currency converter CNNMoney.com

 

currencies (37)

 

·         The term "dollar" has also been adopted by other countries for currencies which do not share a common history with other dollars.

 

·          Anguilla  Bermuda  Bonaire (Netherlands)  British Indian Ocean Territory  Sint Eustatius (Netherlands)  British Virgin Islands  Cayman Islands  Montserrat  Saba (Netherlands)  Turks and Caicos Islands  Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France) (alongside the Euro) Afghanistan Cambodia Lebanon Mexico Peru Guatemala Panama Bolivia Fiat Money Eurodollar Amero Dollar sign List of circulating currencies Petrodollar United States one hundred-dollar bill Etymonline (word history) for "buck" and Etymonline (word history) for "dollar" Thesaurus (synonyms) Currency converter CNNMoney.com

 

colonies (29)

 

·         Carried by Dutch traders, this coin was also popular in the Dutch East Indies as well as in the Dutch New Netherland Colony (New York), and circulated throughout the Thirteen Colonies during the 17th and early 18th centuries.

 

·         Some well-worn examples circulating in the Colonies were known as "dog dollars".

 

·         By the mid-18th century, the lion dollar had been replaced by the Spanish "pieces of eight" which were distributed widely in the Spanish colonies in the New World and in the Philippines.

 

·         This symbol (two pillars with S-shaped motto) first appeared in Spaniard 'Pieces of eight', the currency used in the American colonies of the Spanish Empire, which spread to the British colonies and would continue to be used in the United States and Canada.

 

·         Common in the Thirteen Colonies, Spanish dollars were even legal tender in one colony, Virginia.

 

gold (25)

 

·         Silver was mostly removed from U. S. coinage by 1965 and the dollar became a free-floating fiat currency without a commodity backing defined in terms of real gold or silver.

 

·         Canada and Newfoundland were already on the gold standard, and the result was that the value of the dollar in North America increased in relation to silver dollars being used elsewhere, particularly Latin America and the Far East.

 

standard (25)

 

·         As a result, the United States Dollar was defined as a unit of weight equaling 371 4/16th grains (24.057 grams) of pure silver, or 416 grains of standard silver (standard silver being defined as 1,485 parts fine silver to 179 parts alloy).

 

·         Canada and Newfoundland were already on the gold standard, and the result was that the value of the dollar in North America increased in relation to silver dollars being used elsewhere, particularly Latin America and the Far East.

 

·         Hence, by 1935, when China and Hong Kong came off the silver standard, the Straits dollar was worth 2s 4d (11.5p approx) sterling, whereas the Hong Kong dollar was worth only 1s 3d sterling (6p approx).

 

British (25)

 

·         This symbol (two pillars with S-shaped motto) first appeared in Spaniard 'Pieces of eight', the currency used in the American colonies of the Spanish Empire, which spread to the British colonies and would continue to be used in the United States and Canada.

 

·          Anguilla  Bermuda  Bonaire (Netherlands)  British Indian Ocean Territory  Sint Eustatius (Netherlands)  British Virgin Islands  Cayman Islands  Montserrat  Saba (Netherlands)  Turks and Caicos Islands  Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France) (alongside the Euro) Afghanistan Cambodia Lebanon Mexico Peru Guatemala Panama Bolivia Fiat Money Eurodollar Amero Dollar sign List of circulating currencies Petrodollar United States one hundred-dollar bill Etymonline (word history) for "buck" and Etymonline (word history) for "dollar" Thesaurus (synonyms) Currency converter CNNMoney.com

 

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