Meme – Wikipedia summary by WikiSummarizer

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Here are the 10 keywords and summaries in the Wikipedia article referencing the "Meme" keyword.

Meme


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meme


Meme (100)

– A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, which can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena.

 

 

Meme


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meme


Meme (100)

– A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, which can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena.

– The word "meme" is a shortening (modeled on "gene") of mimeme (from Ancient Greek μίμημα Greek pronunciation: [míːmɛːma] mimēma, "something imitated", from μιμεῖσθαι mimeisthai, "to imitate", from μῖμος mimos "mime") and it was coined by the British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976) as a concept for discussion of evolutionary principles in explaining the spread of ideas and cultural phenomena.

– Advocates of the meme idea say that memes may evolve by natural selection, in a manner analogous to that of biological evolution.

– The word meme originated with Dawkins' 1976 book The Selfish Gene.

– To emphasize commonality with genes, Dawkins coined the term "meme" by shortening "mimeme", which derives from the Greek word mimema ("something imitated").

– Dawkins defined the meme as a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation and replication, but later definitions would vary.

– Aaron Lynch described seven general patterns of meme transmission, or "thought contagion": Richard Dawkins initially defined meme as a noun that "conveys the idea of a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation".

– A meme could consist of a single word, or a meme could consist of the entire speech in which that word first occurred.

– She notes that while the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony (listen (help·info)) form a meme widely replicated as an independent unit, one can regard the entire symphony as a single meme as well.


memes (100)

– The concept comes from an analogy: as genes transmit biological information, memes can be said to transmit idea and belief information.

– Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes, in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures.

– Advocates of the meme idea say that memes may evolve by natural selection, in a manner analogous to that of biological evolution.

– Some memes may replicate effectively even when they prove to be detrimental to the welfare of their hosts.

– Dawkins likened the process by which memes survive and change through the evolution of culture to the natural selection of genes in biological evolution.

– Susan Blackmore writes that melodies from Beethoven's symphonies are commonly used to illustrate the difficulty involved in delimiting memes as discrete units.


evolution (33)

– Advocates of the meme idea say that memes may evolve by natural selection, in a manner analogous to that of biological evolution.

– Dawkins wrote that evolution depended not on the particular chemical basis of genetics, but only on the existence of a self-replicating unit of transmission – in the case of biological evolution, the gene.

– Dawkins likened the process by which memes survive and change through the evolution of culture to the natural selection of genes in biological evolution.


genes (21)

– The concept comes from an analogy: as genes transmit biological information, memes can be said to transmit idea and belief information.

– Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes, in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures.

– To emphasize commonality with genes, Dawkins coined the term "meme" by shortening "mimeme", which derives from the Greek word mimema ("something imitated").

– Dawkins likened the process by which memes survive and change through the evolution of culture to the natural selection of genes in biological evolution.

– Life-forms can transmit information both vertically (from parent to child, via replication of genes) and horizontally (through viruses and other means).


Dawkins (15)

– The word "meme" is a shortening (modeled on "gene") of mimeme (from Ancient Greek μίμημα Greek pronunciation: [míːmɛːma] mimēma, "something imitated", from μιμεῖσθαι mimeisthai, "to imitate", from μῖμος mimos "mime") and it was coined by the British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976) as a concept for discussion of evolutionary principles in explaining the spread of ideas and cultural phenomena.

– Laurent noted the use of the term mneme in Maurice Maeterlinck's The Life of the White Ant (1926), and has highlighted similarities to Dawkins' concept.

– The word meme originated with Dawkins' 1976 book The Selfish Gene.

– To emphasize commonality with genes, Dawkins coined the term "meme" by shortening "mimeme", which derives from the Greek word mimema ("something imitated").

Dawkins wrote that evolution depended not on the particular chemical basis of genetics, but only on the existence of a self-replicating unit of transmission – in the case of biological evolution, the gene.

Dawkins likened the process by which memes survive and change through the evolution of culture to the natural selection of genes in biological evolution.

Dawkins defined the meme as a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation and replication, but later definitions would vary.

– Aaron Lynch described seven general patterns of meme transmission, or "thought contagion": Richard Dawkins initially defined meme as a noun that "conveys the idea of a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation".


regard (6)

– Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes, in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures.

– She notes that while the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony (listen (help·info)) form a meme widely replicated as an independent unit, one can regard the entire symphony as a single meme as well.


Richard Dawkins (6)

– The word "meme" is a shortening (modeled on "gene") of mimeme (from Ancient Greek μίμημα Greek pronunciation: [míːmɛːma] mimēma, "something imitated", from μιμεῖσθαι mimeisthai, "to imitate", from μῖμος mimos "mime") and it was coined by the British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976) as a concept for discussion of evolutionary principles in explaining the spread of ideas and cultural phenomena.

– Aaron Lynch described seven general patterns of meme transmission, or "thought contagion": Richard Dawkins initially defined meme as a noun that "conveys the idea of a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation".


memetics (5)

– The lack of a consistent, rigorous, and precise understanding of what typically makes up one unit of cultural transmission remains a problem in debates about memetics.

– Prominent researchers in evolutionary psychology and anthropology, including Scott Atran, Dan Sperber, Pascal Boyer, John Tooby and others, argue the possibility of incompatibility between modularity of mind and memetics.


mind (5)

– A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, which can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena.

– Prominent researchers in evolutionary psychology and anthropology, including Scott Atran, Dan Sperber, Pascal Boyer, John Tooby and others, argue the possibility of incompatibility between modularity of mind and memetics.


selfish gene (4)

– The word "meme" is a shortening (modeled on "gene") of mimeme (from Ancient Greek μίμημα Greek pronunciation: [míːmɛːma] mimēma, "something imitated", from μιμεῖσθαι mimeisthai, "to imitate", from μῖμος mimos "mime") and it was coined by the British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976) as a concept for discussion of evolutionary principles in explaining the spread of ideas and cultural phenomena.

– The word meme originated with Dawkins' 1976 book The Selfish Gene.

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