Oxygen: Wikipedia Visual Summary by WikiSummarizer

This Visual Summary presents the keywords and the key summaries of the Wikipedia article about "Oxygen". The Visual Summary map was automatically created by WikiSummarizer.

WikiSummarizer is a Web-based application that summarizes Wikipedia articles and provides Wikipedia Knowledge Base for comprehensive references, and as learning tool. The Wikipedia summaries can be exported to word editors, browsers, mind mapping applications, databases and content management systems.

Here is a link to the "Oxygen" Visual Summary for navigation in your browser.

 

Wikipedia article:  Oxygen

 

Oxygen

 

Oxygen (100)

 

·         Oxygen ( /ˈɒksɨdʒɨn/ ok-si-jin) is the element with atomic number 8 and represented by the symbol O. Its name derives from the Greek roots ὀξύς (oxys) ("acid", literally "sharp", referring to the sour taste of acids) and -γενής (-genēs) ("producer", literally "begetter"), because at the time of naming, it was mistakenly thought that all acids required oxygen in their composition.

 

·         Oxygen is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table and is a highly reactive nonmetallic element that readily forms compounds (notably oxides) with almost all other elements.

 

·         Oxygen is a strong oxidizing agent and has the second highest electronegativity of all the elements (only fluorine has a higher electronegativity).

 

·         By mass, oxygen is the third most abundant element in the universe after hydrogen and helium and the most abundant element by mass in the Earth's crust, making up almost half of the crust's mass.

 

·         Free oxygen is too chemically reactive to appear on Earth without the photosynthetic action of living organisms, which use the energy of sunlight to produce elemental oxygen from water.

 

·         Oxygen is toxic to obligately anaerobic organisms, which were the dominant form of early life on Earth until O2 began to accumulate in the atmosphere.

 

·         The name oxygen was coined in 1777 by Antoine Lavoisier, whose experiments with oxygen helped to discredit the then-popular phlogiston theory of combustion and corrosion.

 

·         Oxygen is produced industrially by fractional distillation of liquefied air, use of zeolites with pressure-cycling to concentrate oxygen from air, electrolysis of water and other means.

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, oxygen is a very pale blue, odorless gas with the molecular formula O2, in which the two oxygen atoms are chemically bonded to each other with a spin triplet electron configuration.

 

·         Oxygen is the third most abundant chemical element in the universe, after hydrogen and helium.

 

·         The main driving factor of the oxygen cycle is photosynthesis, which is responsible for modern Earth's atmosphere.

 

·         Lavoisier renamed 'vital air' to oxygиne in 1777 from the Greek roots ὀξύς (oxys) (acid, literally "sharp," from the taste of acids) and -γενής (-genēs) (producer, literally begetter), because he mistakenly believed that oxygen was a constituent of all acids.

 

·         In 1805, Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac and Alexander von Humboldt showed that water is formed of two volumes of hydrogen and one volume of oxygen; and by 1811 Amedeo Avogadro had arrived at the correct interpretation of water's composition, based on what is now called Avogadro's law and the assumption of diatomic elemental molecules.

 

·         Hyperbaric (high-pressure) medicine uses special oxygen chambers to increase the partial pressure of O2 around the patient and, when needed, the medical staff.

 

·         Other important organic compounds that contain oxygen are: glycerol, formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, citric acid, acetic anhydride, and acetamide.

 

gas (100)

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a very pale blue, odorless, tasteless diatomic gas with the formula O2.

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, oxygen is a very pale blue, odorless gas with the molecular formula O2, in which the two oxygen atoms are chemically bonded to each other with a spin triplet electron configuration.

 

·         In the meantime, on August 1, 1774, an experiment conducted by the British clergyman Joseph Priestley focused sunlight on mercuric oxide (HgO) inside a glass tube, which liberated a gas he named "dephlogisticated air".

 

pressure (89)

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a very pale blue, odorless, tasteless diatomic gas with the formula O2.

 

·         Oxygen is produced industrially by fractional distillation of liquefied air, use of zeolites with pressure-cycling to concentrate oxygen from air, electrolysis of water and other means.

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, oxygen is a very pale blue, odorless gas with the molecular formula O2, in which the two oxygen atoms are chemically bonded to each other with a spin triplet electron configuration.

 

·         Hyperbaric (high-pressure) medicine uses special oxygen chambers to increase the partial pressure of O2 around the patient and, when needed, the medical staff.

 

compounds (45)

 

·         Oxygen is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table and is a highly reactive nonmetallic element that readily forms compounds (notably oxides) with almost all other elements.

 

·         Other important organic compounds that contain oxygen are: glycerol, formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, citric acid, acetic anhydride, and acetamide.

 

acids (43)

 

·         Oxygen ( /ˈɒksɨdʒɨn/ ok-si-jin) is the element with atomic number 8 and represented by the symbol O. Its name derives from the Greek roots ὀξύς (oxys) ("acid", literally "sharp", referring to the sour taste of acids) and -γενής (-genēs) ("producer", literally "begetter"), because at the time of naming, it was mistakenly thought that all acids required oxygen in their composition.

 

·         Lavoisier renamed 'vital air' to oxygиne in 1777 from the Greek roots ὀξύς (oxys) (acid, literally "sharp," from the taste of acids) and -γενής (-genēs) (producer, literally begetter), because he mistakenly believed that oxygen was a constituent of all acids.

 

oxide (40)

 

·         In the meantime, on August 1, 1774, an experiment conducted by the British clergyman Joseph Priestley focused sunlight on mercuric oxide (HgO) inside a glass tube, which liberated a gas he named "dephlogisticated air".

 

mass (35)

 

·         By mass, oxygen is the third most abundant element in the universe after hydrogen and helium and the most abundant element by mass in the Earth's crust, making up almost half of the crust's mass.

 

temperature (32)

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a very pale blue, odorless, tasteless diatomic gas with the formula O2.

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, oxygen is a very pale blue, odorless gas with the molecular formula O2, in which the two oxygen atoms are chemically bonded to each other with a spin triplet electron configuration.

 

air (31)

 

·         Oxygen is produced industrially by fractional distillation of liquefied air, use of zeolites with pressure-cycling to concentrate oxygen from air, electrolysis of water and other means.

 

·         In the meantime, on August 1, 1774, an experiment conducted by the British clergyman Joseph Priestley focused sunlight on mercuric oxide (HgO) inside a glass tube, which liberated a gas he named "dephlogisticated air".

 

·         Lavoisier renamed 'vital air' to oxygиne in 1777 from the Greek roots ὀξύς (oxys) (acid, literally "sharp," from the taste of acids) and -γενής (-genēs) (producer, literally begetter), because he mistakenly believed that oxygen was a constituent of all acids.

 

atoms (24)

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a very pale blue, odorless, tasteless diatomic gas with the formula O2.

 

·         At standard temperature and pressure, oxygen is a very pale blue, odorless gas with the molecular formula O2, in which the two oxygen atoms are chemically bonded to each other with a spin triplet electron configuration.

————————————–

· This summary was produced by WikiSummarizer for Wikipedia

 

· WikiSummarizer is an automated text summarization and text mining application created by Context Discovery Inc

 

· If you are interested in using WikiSummarizer technology please contact us at wikisummarizer@contextdiscovery.com

 

——————————————————

About Context Discovery WikiSummarizer

WikiSummarizer is a Web-based summarization portal that summarizes Web pages and documents in English, French, Spanish, and German.

The summaries are stored in organizational knowledge library. Report writers, including web-based ones, can be easily used for knowledge mining of the summaries, keywords and links. The Wikipedia Knowledge Base search function works as a back-of-the-book index pointing to the most relevant summaries and links.

The keywords and summaries are easily exported to other applications such as word editors, browsers, mind mapping applications like Mindjet MindManager, MindGenius, XMind, and any other mind mapping application.

The Visual Summary can be navigated in any browser on Windows, Mac, Linux, iPhone, iPad and Android devices.

For more information about installing WikiSummarizer for your organization or as a cloud server please contact wikisummarizer@contextdiscovery.com

 

 

 

About Henry

Hi, I’m Henry Lewkowicz and I’m the CEO of Context Discovery Inc. For long time I have been interested in the importance of context in understanding information. Intuitively we recognize the meaning of context when we say “you took my words out of context”. This phrase vividly signifies how much we care about our intentions and point of view. I believe that in the Internet age context plays a big role in rapid understanding of information. I’ll go on the record and say that in fact seeing information in context dramatically speeds understanding and simplifies application of information. In this blog I hope to have a lively dialog with you on a range of subjects related to context, information overload, knowledge, learning and other fun topics. In the course of doing it I will be using our own application, Context Organizer, as an experiment in capturing in 1 sentence what bloggers and other writers publish. I hope that we all will have some fun with it and learn more about communicating. Although this is primarily a technology and business blog, to great degree it's also my personal blog. From time to time, amongst the customary posts, I will write about issues that I passionately care about, my travels, and photos that I've taken. Periodically I refer to my family or friends, and sometimes you even see my vacation photos. I hope to make lots of new friends and learn a great deal in the process. Life is too short…. Enjoy, and feel free to write to me.
This entry was posted in WikiSummarizer and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.