Republic: Wikipedia summary by WikiSummarizer

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Here are the 10 keywords and summaries in the Wikipedia article referencing the "Republic" keyword.

 

Wikipedia article:  Republic

 

Republic

 

Republic (100)

 

·         A republic is a form of government in which the people, or some significant portion of them, retain supreme control over the government, at least in theory, and where offices of state are not granted through heritage.

 

·         The common modern definition of a republic is a government having a head of state who is not a monarch.

 

·         The word "republic" is derived from the Latin phrase res publica, which can be translated as "a public affair", and often used to describe a state using this form of government.

 

 

Wikipedia article:  Republic

 

Republic

 

Republic (100)

 

·         A republic is a form of government in which the people, or some significant portion of them, retain supreme control over the government, at least in theory, and where offices of state are not granted through heritage.

 

·         The common modern definition of a republic is a government having a head of state who is not a monarch.

 

·         The word "republic" is derived from the Latin phrase res publica, which can be translated as "a public affair", and often used to describe a state using this form of government.

 

·         In classical and medieval times the archetype of all republics was the Roman Republic, which referred to Rome in between the period when it had kings, and the periods when it had emperors.

 

·         Today the term republic still most commonly means a system of government which derives its power from the people rather than from another basis, such as heredity or divine right.

 

·         Arwad has been cited as one of the earliest known examples of a republic, in which the people, rather than a monarch, are described as sovereign.

 

·         The Israelite confederation of the era before the United Monarchy has also been considered a type of republic.

 

·         The first European republic after the demise of the Roman Republic in 44-27 BC, was the Icelandic Commonwealth, which also saw the establishment of the world's oldest existing parliament, the Althing.

 

·         The Constitution of the United States ratified in 1789 created a relatively strong federal republic to replace the relatively weak confederation under the first attempt at a national government with the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union ratified in 1783.

 

republics (100)

 

·         Both modern and ancient republics vary widely in their ideology and composition.

 

·         In classical and medieval times the archetype of all republics was the Roman Republic, which referred to Rome in between the period when it had kings, and the periods when it had emperors.

 

·         The political philosophy of the classical republics has had a central influence on republican thought throughout the subsequent centuries.

 

·         The leaders of the revolution were well versed in the writings of the French liberal thinkers, and also in history of the classical republics.

 

government (39)

 

·         A republic is a form of government in which the people, or some significant portion of them, retain supreme control over the government, at least in theory, and where offices of state are not granted through heritage.

 

·         The common modern definition of a republic is a government having a head of state who is not a monarch.

 

·         The word "republic" is derived from the Latin phrase res publica, which can be translated as "a public affair", and often used to describe a state using this form of government.

 

·         James Madison, the fourth President of the United States, compared republican government to democratic government, and found democracy wanting.

 

·         Montesquieu included both democracies, where all the people have a share in rule, and aristocracies or oligarchies, where only some of the people rule, as republican forms of government.

 

·         Today the term republic still most commonly means a system of government which derives its power from the people rather than from another basis, such as heredity or divine right.

 

·         This bipartite division of government types differs from the classical sources, and also the earlier of Machiavelli's own works, which divided governments into three types: monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy.

 

·         The Constitution of the United States ratified in 1789 created a relatively strong federal republic to replace the relatively weak confederation under the first attempt at a national government with the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union ratified in 1783.

 

head (10)

 

·         The common modern definition of a republic is a government having a head of state who is not a monarch.

 

monarch (8)

 

·         The common modern definition of a republic is a government having a head of state who is not a monarch.

 

·         Arwad has been cited as one of the earliest known examples of a republic, in which the people, rather than a monarch, are described as sovereign.

 

republican (8)

 

·         James Madison, the fourth President of the United States, compared republican government to democratic government, and found democracy wanting.

 

·         Montesquieu included both democracies, where all the people have a share in rule, and aristocracies or oligarchies, where only some of the people rule, as republican forms of government.

 

·         The political philosophy of the classical republics has had a central influence on republican thought throughout the subsequent centuries.

 

modern (7)

 

·         The common modern definition of a republic is a government having a head of state who is not a monarch.

 

·         Both modern and ancient republics vary widely in their ideology and composition.

 

control (7)

 

·         A republic is a form of government in which the people, or some significant portion of them, retain supreme control over the government, at least in theory, and where offices of state are not granted through heritage.

 

common (5)

 

·         The common modern definition of a republic is a government having a head of state who is not a monarch.

 

·         In the late Middle Ages, writers, such as Giovanni Villani, began thinking about the nature of these states and the differences from the more common monarchies.

 

ideology (5)

 

·         Both modern and ancient republics vary widely in their ideology and composition.

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·         This summary was produced by WikiSummarizer for Wikipedia

 

·         WikiSummarizer is an automated text summarization and text mining application created by Context Discovery Inc

 

·         If you are interested in using WikiSummarizer technology please contact us at wikisummarizer@contextdiscovery.com

 

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